growing paynes – a sketchbook

The Zombies in the Wood.

I love the idea for the first drawing but its too rough. The re-draw is cleaner and and I had the chance to really think about the background trees. I have been working on similar drawings as a result and I even have some ideas for a new project.

 

Tash.

I redrew this for a couple for reasons – I couldn’t find the references for the photos I had used which made me feel uncomfortable using it,  and I thought it had been rushed and over worked and it was inconsistent with the style I used for the other characters.  I think the new one looks cleaner and is more in line with the other character portraits (for the zombie book), plus, she came mostly out of my head.

Stella’s Boots.

I redrew the boots as the first drawing just didn’t tell a story; it is dull. The second attempt shows a lot more of Stella’s personality, and her hidden blade.

Personal Project for Funeral Pyrate

Playtime

Practicing figure drawing using many different inspiring titles and approaches (above)

Bibliography

A Brain is for Eating, D and A Jacobs, illustrated by Scott Brundage, Pale Dot Voyage, 2013

Martin, Justin.,  Poses for Artists, Vol. 1 and 2, Standing Poses, Eagel Ink Factory, Justin Martin, 2016.

Anatomy Essentials, Imagine FX/Future Publishing.

Sketches and experiments from Fantasy Underground – How to Draw Zombies

Fantasy Underground – How to Draw Zombies,  Butkis, M, and Destefano, M, Walter Foster Publishing Inc, 2010

I love the 3dtotal sketchbook series. They also made a great book “Beginners Guide to Sketching…” which I am working my way through. Some of the sketches I have worked on are included here.

 

A lot of my references  are from unfortunate Victorian criminals – I found some amazing examples of mugshots which were originally on the old Retronaut site – now on Tyne and Wear Museum’s pinterest page – which got me interested in looking at the less wealthy side of the Victorians – the photographs made me feel sort of sad for these people. Mostly, they look scared and hungry. I wanted to know more about them, and to draw them – I have been thinking about this project for a few years and have no idea where it’s going – if nothing else, it has given me some interesting subjects to play with and I’ve sort of come to care for them, which makes me want to do a better job.

The Zombie book portraits are only very loosely based on some of the unfortunate Victorians – I used them to find an eye here, and a nose there as I created imagined characters for the story I am illustrating. They were never intended to look like those people but I can recognise characteristics and see my observation has improved.

Below are examples of some of the Victorians I did just for fun. The younger guy started off as a potential character for the book but I decided half way through he should remain a Victorian. I might make a picture book about him. He looks like he needs an adventure!

Anatomy

I want to draw from the inside out. A skeleton seems like a good start so I began with the skeleton and then drew muscles on tracing paper so I can lay it over the original drawing.

Anatomy for Fantasy Artists – An essential guide to creating action figures and fantastical forms, Fabry, G., and Cormack, B., David and Charles Publishers, 2006.

Gesture

These are some of the gesture sketches for the finished zombie hand on my drawing paynes page. They were done quickly and loosely and were inspired by the class I bought on Craftsy . (That very useful online resource which provides tuition videos and feedback on many creative endeavours).

I think these sketches are good examples the progress I have made so far and as I continue to practice I will keep adding the sketches here so I can look back at the fatal flaws and maybe laugh (cry) a bit.

Exploring book cover ideas

Experimenting with watercolour and watercolour pencils.

This is work from my watercolour sketchbook. I have been practicing the flowers and the skulls as they are a small part of a larger illustration.  I love Alphonse Mucha’s work and I am using him as inspiration for the style and colours.

 

Flora and Fauna

One of the first things I started drawing was trees. I love the skeletal structures of winter trees and this is something I tended to look at, pretty much ignoring the seemingly difficult leafy canopies. Since it is important to try and overcome these fears (not spiders)  I have come to realise drawing trees is like drawing anything else – you have to focus on the form and ignore the details – look for the larger shapes, then go on to the smaller shapes within them –and don’t focus on every individual leaf.

Of course the fine details such as individual twigs and leaves can be a drawing in their own right and it’s a good excuse to bring all these lovely things  home – I seem to collect quite a lot of things from nature I find fallen in the park and woods.

 Bibliography

John-Naylor, D., Drawing Tress, Search Press, 2009.

Sketching from the Imagination – An insight into creative drawing, 3dtotal Publishing, 2015

Sketching from the Imagination: Fantasy, 3dtotal Publishing, 2015

Sketching from the Imagination: Sci Fi, 3dtotal Publishing, 2015

Beginners Guide to Sketching: characters, creatures and concepts, 3dtotal Publishing, 2015

3dtotal.com

https://uk.pinterest.com/twmuseums/19th-century-mugshots-1871-1873/

Craftsy.com

Faigin, G., The Artists Complete Guide to Facial Expression, Watson-Guptill Publications, 1992

Fantasy Underground – How to Draw Zombies,  Butkis, M, and Destefano, M, Walter Foster Publishing Inc, 2010

Anatomy for Fantasy Artists – An essential guide to creating action figures and fantastical forms, Fabry, G., and Cormack, B., David and Charles Publishers, 2006.

A Brain is for Eating, D and A Jacobs, illustrated by Scott Brundage, Pale Dot Voyage, 2013

Martin, Justin.,  Poses for Artists, Vol. 1 and 2, Standing Poses, Eagel Ink Factory, Justin Martin, 2016.

Anatomy Essentials, Imagine FX/Future Publishing.